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IL-4 and IL-13 are key drivers of Type 2 inflammation in severe asthma2–5

Patients with severe asthma risk mortality and corticosteroid-related comorbidities6–9

DUPIXENT is a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds specifically to the IL-4Rα subunit and inhibits IL-4 and IL-13 signalling1

DUPIXENT is indicated in adults and adolescents 12 years and older as add-on maintenance treatment for severe asthma with Type 2 inflammation characterised by raised blood eosinophils (EOS) and/or raised fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), who are inadequately controlled with high-dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) plus another medicinal product for maintenance treatment1

No single biomarker fully captures the complexity of Type 2 inflammation in asthma3,4,10–13

LATEST NEWS & EVENTS

DUPIXENT pre-filled pen

DUPIXENT can now be administered by a pre-filled pen1

DUPIXENT was studied in one Phase 2b and two Phase 3 clinical trials including 2,888 patients aged ≥12 years, with uncontrolled moderate-to-severe and severe asthma for up to 52 weeks1

The safety profile of DUPIXENT has been explored in the complexity of Type 2 inflammation in asthma, studied up to 1 year1

What types of severe asthma patients can benefit from DUPIXENT?

  • Patients who are struggling to control their disease
    with their current treatment1
  • Patients who are 12 years and older that have severe
    asthma with Type 2 inflammation characterised by
    raised blood EOS and/or raised FeNO1

 

INTRODUCING THE DUPIXENT PRE-FILLED PEN

A convenient option to ensure patients
administer DUPIXENT as directed1

EOS, eosinophils; FeNO, fractional exhaled nitric oxide; ICS, inhaled corticosteroids; IL, interleukin; OCS, oral corticosteroids; R, receptor.

References

  1. Sanofi Genzyme. Dupixent Summary of Product Characteristics, December 2020.
  2. Tran TN, et al. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2016;116(1):37–42.
  3. Seys SF, et al. Respir Res. 2017;18:39.
  4. Peters MC, et al. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014;133(2):388–394.
  5. Doran E, et al. Front Med. 2017;4:139.
  6. Asthma UK (2017). Severe asthma: the unmet need and the global challenge. Available at: https://www.asthma.org.uk/globalassets/get-involved/external-affairscampaigns/publications/severeasthma-report/auk_severeasthma_2017.pdf. Date accessed: May 2021.
  7. Asthma UK. What is severe asthma? Available at: https://www.asthma.org.uk/advice/severeasthma/what-is-severe-asthma/#Whatissevere. Date accessed: May 2021.
  8. Sweeney J, et al. Thorax. 2016;71(4):339–346.
  9. Why asthma still kills. The National Review of Asthma Deaths (NRAD). May 2014. Available at: https://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/projects/outputs/why-asthma-still-kills. Date accessed: May 2021.
  10. Peters MC, et al. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2019;143(1):104–113.e14.
  11. GINA. Global Initiative for Asthma. Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention, 2020. Available at: https://ginasthma.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/GINA-2020-report_20_06_04-1-wms.pdf. Date accessed: May 2021.
  12. Amaral R, et al. Clin Transl Allergy. 2018;8:13.
  13. Silkoff PE, et al. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2017;140(3):710–719.